Wednesday, December 20, 2006

The Road Ahead

Well, the heavens have descended dumping their contents on my hometown. I'm snowed in, stranded, and at a standstill waiting for the new direction, the new road. A pure white world. A long night. How amazing to have a New Moon and a New Sun together. I'm even doing my laundry, and if this ambition continues, steam ironing is ahead. Oh, and another vegetable soup. The old standard. The solid rock.
We will see what path emerges.
Illustration by Chris Van Allsburg from Jumanji.

14 Comments:

Blogger jm said...

Everytime I experience weather like this it makes me wonder. Just a couple of days ago it was like spring and now the world is completely changed. Everything changes continually, yet nothing does, so it seems. Soon the town will be entirely different yet back to the ususal.

I always wonder what change really is. Do we go around and around a wheel, or is it a spiral moving forward? Positively no way of knowing when inside the cycle.

I can't imagine that anything truly repeats itself. Is it our need for the comfort of repetition, the familiar, that creates the illusion?

20/12/06 6:59 PM  
Blogger Kadimiros said...

It got cold fast here, too.

I'm at a lovely spacious calm between finishing up a rush of jobs, and about to jump headlong into new ones. Change and contrast can make the moment appear more precious. Tomorrow afternoon, it will be off to shop for Christmas presents for the godkids, etc.

Some people think there is a part of consciousness that's outside of everything else. But then again, other people think there's really no outside. Words. :-)

Some speculate that time and space are attributes of everything that exists, not simply dimensions through things pass. But then, if anything truly repeated in all respects, it would simply be itself and no other. In which case, there's no difference to tell.

Could all just be a matter of perspective.

At the store last week, I had fun browsing those "Magic Eye" (a type of autostereogram) calendars while shopping, wondering what that reveals about the hidden potentials of perception in other areas. The manufacturer's Web site claims there are health benefits.

The trick of seeing more information through perceiving the optical illusion. Shift the visual focus as if to look through the flat image, and a three-dimensional image becomes startlingly clear, the image becoming like a window into a hidden scene. Those who can't manage the trick of seeing the illusion of depth, can't make out the hidden images.

weekly samples

autostereogram sketcher

21/12/06 1:59 AM  
Blogger jm said...

Lovely, indeed kad. This moment of calm and reflection.

But then, if anything truly repeated in all respects, it would simply be itself and no other. In which case, there's no difference to tell.

Yes. It's all comparison and contrast. The illusion of repetition is probably a frame of reference that preserves our sanity.
That's why the rhymes and reps of music. To anchor us and bring us back to some sort of home. Keep us from spinning out like we feel as infants sometimes. Without connection.

The whole thing is so plastic. I think we create the rigidity and in becomes habitual. These pictures reveal just how much.

If we constantly shifted perception like this it would be overwhelming, like a hallucinogenic drug.
It's interesting speculation about the health benefits.

How does one train the eye?

21/12/06 2:26 AM  
Blogger jm said...

Oh I saw it. Instructions. I think I tried this a long long time ago if my memory serves me well. Something should serve me by this time.

21/12/06 2:29 AM  
Blogger Kadimiros said...

To see the 3D scene, I look through the surface of the picture, to about the same distance as if I were looking at myself in a mirror. It feels odd until I hit the right point of focus.

Due to deficiencies in some production methods, occasionally artifacts or 3D floaters appear until I tweak the focus to resolve them into a more integrated image. As the background starts to appear to recede from the plane of the picture, it helps to gaze into the illusory distance (to prevent one's gaze from snapping back to the real plane of the picture's surface).

Oh, we used to play spinning games with the babies to distract them while waiting for the adults to get ready to leave the house.

21/12/06 9:32 AM  
Blogger jm said...

Spinning games with the babies? Big family?

21/12/06 1:13 PM  
Blogger Kadimiros said...

Causing small toys and objects (not necessarily intended for spinning) to spin, or picking up the child and spinning around until both child and adult are dizzy. Verbally dramatized like so: "We're spinning! And spinning! Faster and faster! We're out of connnntrrrollll!!! Boom! We fell down!" This works best on a heavy carpet with lots of throw pillows. Physical strength and stamina is helpful, especially if the child wants more.

Either that, or put them in the stroller and wheel them in circles around the room while singing "Downtown".

21/12/06 3:54 PM  
Blogger jm said...

LOL!!! Excellent description. A novelist's touch.

connnntrrrollll!!! Boom! We fell down!" This works best on a heavy carpet with lots of throw pillows

The little human creature does like the whirling dervish fun.
I didn't though. I'm prone to vertigo. I had to pretend to enjoy it when my father flipped us all. The group is murderous.

Either that, or put them in the stroller and wheel them in circles around the room while singing "Downtown".

With you as the singer? Tenor? Baritone?

21/12/06 4:03 PM  
Blogger Kadimiros said...

Oh, one does have to be sensitive to the child's individuality. The boys loved it, though. Another game was raising and lowering the baby repeatedly in the air over the father's face. Prone on the floor, the father would make a funny face as the baby came closer. It made the baby laugh uproariously. Even better than "Who's That Baby in the Mirror?" It helps if there's something intrinsically funny about the father's face to begin with.

Probably baritone, maybe dipping slightly lower sometimes. I think everyone tried singing, but I had a bit more control over the breath and sound.

21/12/06 4:29 PM  
Blogger jm said...

Another game was raising and lowering the baby repeatedly in the air over the father's face. Prone on the floor, the father would make a funny face as the baby came closer. It made the baby laugh uproariously.

I LOVED THAT ONE!

My Dad made the funniset faces on earth. Even when I was an adult. When all else failed, all I had to do was look at him.

It helps if there's something intrinsically funny about the father's face to begin with.

No doubt. He was adorable.

Baritone. Excellent. You could be the Pirate King in Gilbert & Sullivan's Pirates of Penzance.

21/12/06 4:38 PM  
Blogger Kadimiros said...

What fun! Perhaps there can be such fresh delight on Earth that even beings older than the Sun and Moon must smile to see. When adults fret over imagined tomorrows, I point at the very young and say, "And he's doing the smart thing. He's being a baby!"

Now what makes faces and personalities, young or old, adorable, I wonder. :-) Venusian charm, maybe.

21/12/06 8:06 PM  
Blogger jm said...

Perhaps there can be such fresh delight on Earth that even beings older than the Sun and Moon must smile to see.

Nice.

Now what makes faces and personalities, young or old, adorable, I wonder. :-) Venusian charm, maybe.

Fantastic question. Hormones and emotional reactions. Sight triggers reaction. I'd love to know. I don't think it's Venus exactly.

Babies are incredibly attuned to faces. I've always wonderd what they see. When they start spontaneously laughing for example.

21/12/06 8:20 PM  
Blogger Kadimiros said...

Yes, that is a good one. Just what in the world makes a baby giggle away as if at something adults can't see. Maybe we tend to see less after our brains wire for spoken language.

Beware overly verbose astrologers, heheh!

21/12/06 8:30 PM  
Blogger Kadimiros said...

It's possible to flush the mind's eye clear of the subconscious traces of old thoughtforms. Then the world looks brilliant and crisp, and the branches of trees stand out from the air with exquisite depth, and the substance of the air itself seems to nestle just so around the twigs and leaves. What seems empty space is then layered with intrigue, and the sunlight passing through it illumines with curious knowing.

And I wonder if anyone's ever used stereograms to cheat on school examinations. :-)

21/12/06 9:11 PM  

<< Home